September is National Preparedness Month: Are you ready?

Kimberly Bean
Published on August 28, 2019

September is National Preparedness Month: Are you ready?

Each September since 2004, National Preparedness Month “reminds Americans to be prepared for disasters or emergencies in their homes, businesses, and communities,” according to Ready.gov.

How is this working out for us?

After 15 years, 75 percent of us have set aside emergency supplies but fewer than 50 percent of us have an emergency plan.

After compiling your supply kit, it’s important to make an emergency plan for the family. To be completely prepared, you may want to get some emergency preparedness training.

Prepared for what?

According to the president’s annual proclamation, preparedness is not meant for only weather and natural disasters. Since those are the most common, let’s start there.

If you live in a disaster-prone area, you’ll want to take extra precautions. Just in the past few years, Americans and Southern Marylanders have experienced catastrophic losses from:

  • Hurricane
  • Wildfire
  • Tornado
  • Flood
  • Volcanic eruption
  • Earthquake

But there are other dangers to prepare for as well:

  • Hazardous materials leaks and spills
  • Extreme heat and cold
  • Power outages
  • Active shooter
  • Terrorist-related incidents
  • Drought
  • Landslide
  • Tsunami
  • Infectious disease outbreaks
  • Community unrest
  • Nuclear explosion

Yes, the list can be frightening, especially if you’re unprepared. Take the following steps now to increase your family’s protection (both physical and financial) in the future.

Get insured

“Insured losses due to natural disasters in the United States in 2018 totaled $52 billion,” says the Insurance Information Institute. While that sounds like a rather large chunk of money, consider 2017’s losses: $78 billion.

More than one-third of those losses were due to droughts, wildfires, and heat waves. Other losses incurred were due to tropical, winter, and severe thunder storms; floods; and earthquakes.

It is estimated, however, that half of the total dollar amount of losses caused by natural disasters are uninsured. The costs are therefore passed on to the victims or the taxpayers.

Natural disaster damage that is not covered under standard homeowners policies include:

  • Floods – If you live in an area prone to flooding, you can purchase insurance coverage through the National Flood Insurance Program. Learn more about it at gov.
  • Earthquakes – Most large insurers offer either separate earthquake coverage or an endorsement to your current policy.

If you cannot afford to replace your Southern Maryland home, either in its entirety or any portion that is damaged, purchase insurance.

Protect important paperwork

Gather, copy and protect all of your vital documents. These include:

  • Driver’s licenses
  • Adoption papers
  • Social security cards
  • Birth certificates
  • Passports
  • Citizenship papers
  • Child custody papers, military ID, or DD Form 214
  • Current photos of your pets along with copies of vaccination records and chip ID numbers
  • Title to your home or loan information
  • Car registration
  • Insurance policies (homeowners, flood, earthquake, auto, life, etc.)
  • Health insurance cards
  • Detailed photos of the home and its contents

Ensure that physical copies of the documents are kept away from the home, such as in a safe deposit box or with a relative in an area not prone to disaster.

Stash cash

The experts at Ready.gov suggest that the average family should have cash in the amount of $2,400. Yes, that’s easier said than done. Any amount of cash will help, so start small and keep adding to your stash.

Prepare an emergency kit

Supplies that you’ll need during the recovery from disaster vary according to the size of your family, your age, the ages of your children, the weather, and more.

For example, older Americans living alone won’t have to stock up on baby formula and diapers but may want to ensure they have extra prescription and over-the-counter medications they use frequently.

For a good overview of what to consider adding to your supply list, consult FEMA.gov. And, don’t forget your pets. Although this list at TheSeniorDog.com is based on the needs of a senior dog, it can be used for any dog or cat.

Add to the list collars, harnesses, leashes, feeding bowls and food.

Develop a family emergency response plan

The chances are good that your family won’t be together if a disaster hits. How will you contact one another? Where will you meet up?

A family emergency plan is imperative, especially if your children are young. Get help creating one online at USA.gov.

Accokeek MD Homes for Sale and Real Estate Services in Southern Maryland. You now have a search engine to help you with your Southern Maryland home search! And I’m ready to provide you with a custom home valuation if you’re considering selling your home. Let’s connect to discuss how I can help you. Contact Kimberly Bean at 301-440-1309

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